Tag Archives: Careers with Code

Industry Minister launches 5th anniversary of Careers with STEM

On Friday 2nd November, the Minister for Industry, Science and Technology, the Hon Karen Andrews, MP formally launched the Careers with STEM: Code magazine fifth anniversary edition.

Attending Palm Beach Currumbin State High School in Queensland, Heather Catchpole, Head of Content at Refraction Media lead a panel discussion on the state of future careers and the necessity of STEM skills for tomorrow’s workforce.

“We started Careers with STEM in 2014 in response to an industry need for skilled graduates for the future of work,” says Catchpole.

“Since then we’ve profiled more than 250 people’s paths into STEM careers, reached 250,000 people through our digital platforms and sent 1.25 million magazines to students in Australia, New Zealand and the USA.”

Joining Minister Andrews on the panel was Sally-Ann Williams, Engineering Community and Outreach Manager for Google Australia, Sharon Collins, Head of Future Talent Strategy, Community and Inclusion at Commonwealth Bank, and Jennifer May, Graduate Engineer at Commonwealth Bank and cover star of Careers with STEM: Engineering 2018.

Careers with STEM: Code magazine is one of four annual magazines in the Careers with STEM series produced by Refraction Media. The magazines provide educators, students and parents with employer insights, industry trends, career pathways and inspiring and diverse role models who share their STEM journey.

“By combining skills in STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) with students’ ‘X’ – their interests, goals and another field, we’re connecting with the students who traditionally might not have seen themselves in a STEM role,” says Catchpole.

Currently, there are 300,000 vacancies in global cybersecurity careers, and it’s expected that we will require 200,000 ICT jobs filled in the next five years in Australia alone. Despite this growing demand, there are fewer than 5000 Australian ICT graduates per year. The latest issue of Code magazine explores opportunities within the fast-growing careers of the entire tech industry, with a bonus flip-issue of Careers with STEM: Cybersecurity.

Since the launch of Careers with STEM: Code magazine 5 years ago, Refraction Media has distributed over 1.25 million copies – for free – to Australian, New Zealand and American high schools.

Minister Andrews’ launch of the latest magazine will celebrate a nationwide delivery of 225,000 copies to 3000 high schools around Australia.

Read the Careers with STEM: Code e-magazine here.

Google CwC STEM cropped

Careers with STEM: Code celebrates fifth birthday

Image credit: Google professionals Tina, Fontaine, Deepa and Joël (Lauren Trompp, 2018).

The upcoming magazine is set to be one of the most diverse representations of STEM careers yet.

It showcases real-life pathways to technology careers, promotes diversity and celebrates people in STEM doing exciting things, all to encourage Australian students to get into STEM.

From October 15, a box of the glossy Careers with STEM magazines will be sent out to every Australian high school –  a collaboration between two of Australia’s biggest STEM employers (Google and the Commonwealth Bank of Australia), the Government and agile STEM startup, publisher Refraction Media.

75% of the fastest growing jobs will require skills in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) and yet only 16% of university students graduate with a STEM degree, according to a PwC report. “We can’t say what the careers of the future will be, but we know that technology and STEM skills will underpin all careers,” says Heather Catchpole, co-founder and Head of Content at Refraction.

Careers with STEM: Code  is one of a quarterly series of print magazines and accompanies the online hub CareerswithSTEM.com, which features the most in-demand STEM careers, inspirational profiles and study resources for students and teachers. Refraction co-founder and CEO Karen Taylor-Brown explains that the magazines and e-portal were created to close the gap between students’ perception of STEM careers and the reality. “Careers with STEM is about smashing stereotypes around careers, driving diversity and celebrating Australia’s STEM-stars.”

This year, Careers with STEM: Code focuses on the most in-demand Computer Science (CS) jobs and the versatility of digital literacy for any career. With tips on how to design a CS career, diversity in tech and a Cybersecurity special, students will be well-equipped to map out their own unique pathway to a tech career that suits them.

Students can check out the profiles of several Australian STEM professionals from Google, CBA and more to find out  how they got to where they are now. “Technology and CS are at the heart of innovation in every industry,” says Sally-Ann Williams, Google’s Engineering Outreach Manager.  “New jobs and industries will continue to emerge as technology evolves…My hope is that in the pages of Careers with STEM: Code [students] will be inspired and challenged by the people who are working in these fields.”

Cybersecurity has been named one of the top 5 in-demand jobs right now (LinkedIn Emerging Jobs Report 2017) and another 11,000 cybersecurity specialists are needed over the next decade in Australia alone (CSCGN 2017 Report). The latest issue of Careers with STEM: Code includes a special Cybersecurity addition including  tips from CBA cyber-experts on how to break into the industry.

“Every day, we are faced with new cyber threats, challenges and opportunities, which is why we are constantly seeking talented, passionate and creative people to join the cybersecurity sector,” says Kate Ingwersen, General Manager of CISTO (Chief Information Security & Trust Officer) at CBA. “There is a world of opportunity for young people to become our cyber superstars of tomorrow.”

“We’re thrilled to work with so many industry, government and education leaders to bring together Careers with STEM, four times a year, for the last five years”, says Taylor-Brown. “This is a product that can address, at scale, some of the key barriers to careers in STEM, including narrow career vision, real-life relevance and pervasive stereotypes around who works in STEM and what the jobs are.”

“It’s a fantastic magazine…students really enjoy reading about their potential future pathways”, says Matthew Purcell, Head of Digital Innovation at Canberra Grammar School.

Students and teachers are able to pre-order copies of the print magazine now and the e-zine will be available from October 15.

combining skills

Women in STEM: the revolution ahead

On September 8, 70 days after the end of the financial year, Australia marked equal pay day. The time gap is significant as it marks the average additional time it takes for women to work to get the same wages as men.

Optimistically, we’d think this day should slowly move back towards June 30. And there are many reasons for optimism, as our panel of thought leaders point out in our online roundtable of industry, research and government leaders.

Yet celebrating a lessening in inequity is a feel-good exercise we cannot afford to over-indulge in.

While we mark achievements towards improving pipelines to leadership roles, work to increase enrolments of girls in STEM subjects at schools and reverse discrimination at many levels of decision making and representation, the reality is that many of these issues are only just being recognised. Many more are in dire need of being addressed more aggressively.

Direct discrimination against women and girls is something I hear about from mentors, friends and colleagues. It is prevalent and wide-reaching. There is much more we can do to address issues of diversity across STEM areas.

Enrolments of women in STEM degrees vary from 16% in computer science and engineering to 45% in science and 56% in medicine. These figures reinforce that we are teaching the next generation with the vestiges of an education system developed largely by men and for boys. There is a unique opportunity to change this.

Interdisciplinary skills are key to innovation. Millennials today will change career paths more frequently; digital technologies will disrupt traditional career areas. By communicating that STEM skills are an essential foundation that can be combined with your interest, goals or another field, we can directly tap into the next generation. We can prepare them to be agile workers across careers, and bring to the table their skills in STEM along with experiences in business, corporates, art, law and other areas. In this utopian future, career breaks are opportunities to learn and to demonstrate skills in new areas. Part-time work isn’t seen as ‘leaning out’.

We have an opportunity to redefine education in STEM subjects, to improve employability for our graduates, to create stronger, clearer paths to leadership roles, and to redefine why and how we study STEM subjects right from early primary through to tertiary levels.

By combining STEM with X, we are opening up the field to the careers that haven’t been invented yet. As career areas shift, we have the opportunity to unleash a vast trained workforce skilled to adapt, to transition across fields, to work flexibly and remotely.

We need to push this STEM + X agenda right to early education, promoting the study of different fields together, and creating an early understanding of the different needs that different areas require.

This is what drives me to communicate science and STEM through publications such as Careers with Science, Engineering and Code. We want to convey that there are exciting career pathways through studying STEM. But we don’t know what those pathways are – that’s up to them.

Just think how many app developers there were ten year ago – how many UX designers. In 10 or even five years, we can’t predict what the rapidly growing career areas will be. But we can create a STEM aware section of the population and by doing so now, we can ensure that the next generation has an edge in creating and redefining the careers of the future.

Heather Catchpole

Founder and Managing Director, Refraction Media

Read next: CEO of Science and Technology Australia, Kylie Walker, smashes all of the stereotypes in her campaign to celebrate Women in STEM.

People and careers: Meet women who’ve paved brilliant careers in STEM here, find further success stories here and explore your own career options at postgradfutures.com.

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