Smart Contact Lens

February 22, 2016

New light-manipulating nanotechnology may soon be used to make smart contact lenses.

Smart Contact Lens

The University of Adelaide in South Australia worked closely with RMIT University to develop small hi-tech lenses to filter harmful optical radiation without distorting vision.

Dr Withawat Withayachumnankul from the University of Adelaide helped conceive the idea and says the potential applications of the technology included creating new high-performance devices that connect to the internet.

“With advanced techniques to control the properties of surfaces, we can dynamically control their filter properties, which allow us to potentially create devices for high data rate optical communication or smart contact lenses,” he says.

“There is also the potential for it to have Wi-Fi access points and connection to external devices.”

The small lenses could also be used to gather and transmit information on a small display.

While there are numerous possible applications of the device, Withayachumnankul says the original purpose of the lens was an alternative to radiation protective goggles.

“We used a stretchable material called PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) and put some nano-material structures inside that layer which interacts with light,” he says.

“The functionality of the device is that the lens filters the light while maintaining a fully transparent structure, and can protect the eyes from radiation.”

Tiny artificial crystals termed “dielectric resonators” were used to help manipulate the waves of light.

The resonators are a fraction of the wavelength of light (100–500 nanometres) and are 500 times thinner than human hair.

“The current challenge is that the dielectric resonators only work for specific colours, but with our flexible surface we can adjust the operation range simply by stretching it,” Withayachumnankul says.

The materials used to make the lens have proven to be biocompatible and do not create any irritation to the eyes, making the device safe to wear.

Findings of the research were published in leading nano-science journal ACS Nano and were undertaken at RMIT’s Micro Nano Research Facility.

The discovery comes after scientists from the University of South Australia’s Future Industries Institute this month successfully completed “proof of concept” research on a polymer film coating that conducts electricity on a contact lens, with the potential to build miniature electrical circuits that are safe to be worn by a person.

– Caleb Radford

This article was first published by The Lead on 19 February 2016. Read the original article here.

Related stories

10 thoughts on “Leading sustainable design”

    1. Thanks Jeff! We’re going to publish interviews with the leaders of some of the top 25 companies over the course of the week – keep an eye out!

      1. Love to see @buildingiq on this list!! Csiro spin out in 2009, now global award winning player and backed several times by Ausindustry $; listed ASX in dec 2015

        1. Thanks Michael. BuildingiQ does look like a great service for optimising commercial energy use. A number of great contenders certainly made the judges’ job difficult.

  1. Wow some impressive Coys — Would have thought AJX (ASX listed ) and a new kid on the block EDE who both have proven technologies (AJX USA Defence chosen) (EDE huge concrete potential) may have made your list — Thanks… for reading my post. I have no idea on your selection critera BARRY

    1. Thanks Barry. Both those companies look like they’re working on environmentally friendly solutions. The panel of judges considered the following criteria: total market value, annual turnover, patents awarded and cited, funding and investment, growth year-on-year, social value, overseas expansion and major partnerships.

  2. I’m not sure I read the article properly as I suffer from presbyopia – anyone doing anything about this condition?

  3. I’ve been curious about the different uses of contact lenses. I think it’s so interesting that they are developing smart contact lenses! I love the idea of technology like this. I can’t wait to see how it progresses! Thanks for sharing!

    1. Thanks for the great comment Braden! We can’t wait to see the future of this awesome technology too. Did you see some of the weird and wonderful tech in sciencemeetsbusiness.com.au/big-data-big-business/? Umbrella rain sensors, pigeon pollution monitoring. Keep in touch! SMB

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *