Tag Archives: quantum technology

Engineering diamonds to unlock computing potential

Image: Supplied

La Trobe University has formed a partnership to pioneer new diamond fabrication techniques, aiming to accelerate the development of a low-cost, portable alternative to supercomputers.

As part of the Research Hub for Diamond Quantum Materials, researchers at La Trobe, RMIT University and Australian-German quantum computing hardware company, Quantum Brilliance, will engineer the diamond computer chip that sits at the heart of diamond quantum computers.

La Trobe Pro Vice-Chancellor (Graduate & Global Research) Professor Chris Pakes, said diamond-based quantum computing is already disrupting digital platforms that underpin a wide range of industries, including science, health and agriculture.

“Unlike other quantum-based supercomputers sitting in large server-based formats, diamond-based quantum computers are low-cost, portable technologies able to operate at room temperature,” Professor Pakes said.

“This enables them to be used in a broad range of edge applications, which may not be possible with supercomputers, such as satellites, health environments and manufacturing.”

Professor Pakes said the partnership will leverage both universities’ expertise in diamond growth, surface imaging and engineering, and combine it with Quantum Brilliance’s industry experience and manufacturing capabilities.

“All three organisations have world-leading expertise and resources in diamond material sciences – making the hub well placed to develop innovative new approaches to advanced manufacturing in this important future industry,” Professor Pakes said.

Co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Quantum Brilliance, Marcus Doherty, said the hub is another example of collaborative research efforts advancing diamond-based quantum technology and delivering economic benefit to Australia in the years to come.

“Through our partnership with La Trobe University and RMIT University, we will develop the fabrication techniques necessary to enhance the performance of diamond-based quantum computers, to deliver real-world solutions to a broad spectrum of industries,” Mr Doherty said.

The hub is already pursuing several multi-million dollar research projects that are pioneering new diamond fabrication techniques. These Australian-based projects are partially funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) and Quantum Brilliance. 

The research hub is designed to not only make great strides in developing synthetic diamond accelerators, but to create a network of experts in diamond material science for future industry advancements in both countries.

quantum technology

Ensuring Sydney’s place as a global hub for quantum

Sydney Quantum Academy is working to create thousands of well-paid, high-tech jobs building on the city’s quantum strengths.

At an online forum officially launching the Academy this week, Minister for Jobs, Investment, Tourism and Western Sydney, the Hon. Stuart Ayres MP will join representatives from academia and industry to discuss plans to grow the city’s quantum economy, creating new jobs and attracting investment.

Sydney is already home to one of the highest concentrations of quantum research groups in the world and there is a burgeoning quantum tech industry with start-ups like Q-CTRL, government-backed enterprises like Silicon Quantum Computing and global tech giants like Microsoft.

The newly formed Sydney Quantum Academy – a partnership with four world-leading universities Macquarie University, UNSW Sydney, the University of Sydney and UTS, backed by the NSW Government – has been tasked with supercharging the sector’s growth.

Minister Ayres said: “The NSW Government is investing heavily in the infrastructure required to build a world-class technology precinct. This includes investing in support networks for emerging technologies where we have credible expertise.”

“The Academy will keep us at the forefront of quantum technology by developing the future employers, entrepreneurs and the workforce required to sustain the industry’s growth.”

Producing future quantum leaders

Sydney Quantum Academy’s newly appointed CEO Prof Peter Turner spoke of the Academy’s plans to grow the talent pipeline through education and training programs, industry partnerships and internships.

Prof Turner said: “The potential for quantum is enormous, which is why we are seeing significant increases in effort and investment around the world. Quantum technologies will fundamentally change areas like computation and sensing. They will help us to solve problems that we simply can’t solve with classical information technology.”

He added: “The Academy’s unique model means we have the ability and the infrastructure to deliver work-ready graduates and leaders who can help translate quantum research into real-life applications. There are jobs already there with the technology maturing rapidly, but there are many more to come. We need to boost the talent pipeline and anticipate what skills will be required for the future. We can only do this by working closely with industry in Australia and beyond.”

Fuelling the nation’s quantum economy

Cathy Foley, CSIRO’s chief scientist and Australia’s incoming chief scientist spoke on how Sydney will play a central role in developing the nation’s quantum technology sector.

Dr Cathy Foley, Chief Scientist at CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, said: “The investment by the NSW Government in the Sydney Quantum Academy is a great example of the steps that are needed to create and accelerate a quantum ecosystem that will allow the whole of Australia to come together behind an industry that will create jobs and prosperity.”

“Quantum is an industry that is going to do more than create new products and services – it will also catalyse a broader capability that will be transformational for all industries, similar to the effect of the digital revolution. It is going to allow us to do new things and accelerate our ability to solve challenges that seem unsolvable today.”

Dr Foley is a member of the Sydney Quantum Academy’s External Advisory Board which has been established to help SQA bridge the gap between industry, academia and government. The board features 10 senior representatives from government, international and local start-ups, venture capital, and technology firms.

“We’re very fortunate to have these global tech industry and government leaders involved. It demonstrates the significance of what’s happening in the quantum space in Sydney,” said Professor Peter Turner.

Distributed by Medianet

quantum technology

Pioneering quantum physicist to lead Archer’s quantum technology

The new leader was appointed on 17 January 2019. Archer have recently executed an exclusive license agreement on room-temperature quantum technology with the University of Sydney.

Dr Martin Fuechsle, the new Manager of Quantum Technology for Archer, is internationally recognised for developing the smallest transistor, a “single-atom transistor”, and the fabrication of breakthrough quantum computing devices; pioneering achievements that strongly align to Archer’s technology development applications in the global semiconductor and quantum computing industries.

Commenting on the Appointment, Archer CEO Dr Mohammad Choucair said, “Dr Fuechsle is among the few highly talented physicists in the world capable of building quantum devices that push the boundaries of current information processing technology. His skills, experience, and exceptional track record strongly align to Archer’s requirements for developing our key vertical of Quantum Technology, and we look forward to working with him to expand our team and capabilities”.

Dr Martin Fuechsle’s immediate priority will be the technically develop the intellectual property claims in patents which Archer holds exclusive commercial rights to, related to room-temperature quantum computing materials and technology. This will involve applying best practices in the areas of quantum technology, specifically in quantum computing, materials, and spintronics, while advancing Archer’s strategic network in the semiconductor and quantum computing industry.

Successful development of Archer’s room-temperature quantum technology would represent a major global breakthrough in the quantum computing industry, estimated to reach $US29 billion by 2021 and linked to the $US500 billion semiconductor market, catalysed by technical advances that allow for practicality, accessibility, and wide-spread consumer adoption. Patents protecting the Licenced IP have been filed internationally to cover Europe, Australia, United States of America, Japan, Hong Kong, Republic of Korea, and China.

This article was originally published by Archer. Find the full release here.

quantum MRI

Quantum MRI machine to enable drug discovery

Featured image above: Visualisation of a quantum MRI machine. Credit: University of Melbourne

Researchers at the University of Melbourne have developed a way to radically miniaturise a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine using atomic-scale quantum computer technology.

Capable of imaging the structure of a single bio-molecule, the new system would overcome significant technological challenges and provide an important new tool for biotechnology and drug discovery.

The work was published in Nature Communications, and was led by Professor Lloyd Hollenberg at the University of Melbourne, working closely with researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) to design the quantum molecular microscope.

The team propose the use of atomic-sized quantum bits (qubits) normally associated with the development of quantum computers, but here would be employed as highly sensitive quantum sensors to image the individual atoms in a bio-molecule.

“Determining the structure of bio-molecules such as proteins can often be a barrier to the development of novel drugs,” says Hollenberg, Thomas Baker Chair in Physical Biosciences at the University of Melbourne.

“By using quantum sensing to image individual atoms in a bio-molecule, we hope to overcome several issues in conventional biomolecule imaging, ” Hollenberg says.

State-of-the-art techniques create a crystal of the molecule to be studied and use X-ray diffraction to determine the molecules’ average structure. However, the crystallisation and averaging processes may lead to important information being lost. Also, not all bio-molecules can be crystallised – particularly proteins associated with cell membranes, which are critical in the development of new drugs.

“Our system is specifically designed to use a quantum bit as a nano-MRI machine to image the structure of a single protein molecule in their native hydrated environments,” says Hollenberg.

“As part of our research in quantum computing we have also been working on the nearer-term applications of atomic-based quantum technology investigating the use of a single quantum bit as a highly sensitive magnetic field sensor.”

Atomic qubits can be made to exist in two states at the same time, a disturbingly strange property that not only underpins the power of a quantum computer, but also the sensitivity of qubits as nano-sensors.

“In a conventional MRI machine large magnets set up a field gradient in all three directions to create 3D images; in our system we use the natural magnetic properties of a single atomic qubit,” says University of Melbourne PhD researcher Mr. Viktor Perunicic, who was the lead author on the paper.

“The system would be fabricated on-chip, and by carefully controlling the quantum state of the qubit probe as it interacts with the atoms in the target molecule, we can extract information about the positions of atoms by periodically measuring the qubit probe and thus create an image of the molecule’s structure.” says Peruncic.

“The system could be constructed and tested relatively quickly using diamond-based qubits. However, to capture really high resolution molecular images in the longer term, CQC2T’s silicon-based qubits might have the advantage because they have very long quantum coherence,” says Hollenberg.

“The construction of such a quantum MRI machine for single molecule microscopy could revolutionise how we view biological processes at the molecular level, and could lead to the development of new biotechnology and a range of clinical applications.”

This article on the design of a quantum MRI machine was first published by The Melbourne Newsroom on 12 October 2016. Read the original article here.