Industry Futures: latest issue of Australian University Science

November 06, 2020

As science delivers new insights and tools, new industries are emerging. Australian University Science magazine highlights these stories

Australia’s strong science research and training are integral to driving new economies. Universities have a critical role as partners in establishing innovation and technological change in industry.

As science delivers new insights and tools, new industries are emerging, and people with science skills will be essential to these new industries. Australian University Science magazine highlights these stories, showcasing exceptional science teams and Australian science graduates working in industry.

This issue we look at How the Quantum Revolution is scaling up. Moving far beyond super-fast computing, quantum technologies can be applied to detect cancer, detect submarines from the seafloor, and encrypt data in such a way that it can never be hacked. This article from award winning journalist Wilson da Silva covers the exciting developments in this fast-growing industry.

Plus, other industry futures under development in Australia that are building better economies through advanced manufacturing. Algae can make anything that can be made from fossil fuel derived plastic. And the plus side? It’ not only doesn’t emit greenhouse gases: it absorbs them. Read about the UTS Deep Green Biotech Hub and how university science is working with industry in the green economy, future batteries, biotechnology and modelling of new materials.

You can read the full issue, published November 2020 here, or subscribe to receive print copies and more here.

You can also catch up on previous issues on:

Issue 1: Energy Futures, Sept 2019

Issue 2: Water Futures, March 2020

Issue 3: Global Health Futures, July 2020

Australian University Science is published by STEM specialist content company Refraction Media.

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2 thoughts on “Fresh opportunities”

  1. His speech seemed not delivered much from science, he sounded more like politician; his answers to jurnalysts’ questions have not made impression on jurnalyst and viewers. CSRO misses opportunity to address vital areas for Australia during his mandate.

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