Tag Archives: surgery

wound healing

Wound healing clinic to change lives

A dedicated wound healing clinic – the first in Australia – opens on Tuesday, 7 March. It draws together a pool of specialist wound healing talent that includes a vascular surgeon, nurse practitioners, an advanced podiatrist and specialist wound nurses in one spot to treat and assess chronic wounds.

The clinic, Wound Innovations, is in Spring Hill, Brisbane and accessible to all Australians via the Spring Hill teleclinic, which connects patients and health professionals with a specialist from Wound Innovations through videoconferencing facilities. Wound Innovations also offers education for health professionals and will be a site for clinical trials and other research projects. 

Living with a serious wound is incredibly debilitating. “Wounds are painful and can exude a fluid. People with a wound can suffer from a lack of mobility and this leads to less social interaction, and isolation,” explains Dr Ian Griffiths, CEO of the Wound Management Innovation Co-operative Research Centre (CRC), which runs Wound Innovations.

“Often people are afraid to go out because of the smell from their wounds. It can take you down a very dark path.”

Dr Griffiths says there is medical research linking wounds with depression as well as dementia.

The teleclinic takes high resolution photos of each patient’s wounds to monitor progress and the patient provides feedback, while wound healing experts make recommendations for future care. Appointments may attract a Medicare rebate.

Griffiths expects the wound healing clinic and teleclinic to be a life changer for patients and plans to open other wound healing clinics with specialised teams in capital cities around Australia.

He also expects dramatic savings to the Australian healthcare system as fewer people with wounds will end up in hospital. The Wound CRC estimates that wound healing and management costs the Australian healthcare system $2.85 billion a year, but this is considered a conservative figure and one that covers only the tip of the iceberg.

Griffiths hopes big institutions such as aged and residential care homes will join the clinical service and teleclinic. Some have large percentages of residents who need constant, ongoing wound care. “I know of one aged care home with 38% of residents with chronic wounds,” says Griffiths.

Some of the worst wounds to treat stem from chronic diseases such as diabetes. There are more than 4400 amputations in Australia because of diabetic foot wounds and every 30 seconds a lower limb is lost around the world.

Funded by the Federal Government, the Wound CRC has carried out industry led research since 2010. One research project showed that 78% of patients with venous leg ulcers will heal over a 12-week period by using best practice wound care, including compression bandaging.

Patients in many of the CRC’s studies live with the ulcers for 10 to 20 years. In one case, a patient lived with ulcers for 54 years. At the time, Wound CRC was recruiting patients for a project studying wounds that did not clear up after 12 weeks.

The CRC’s extensive wound healing research stretching over seven years is helping the 433,000 Australian patients who are suffering from chronic wounds at any one time. Their research covers diabetic foot ulcers, burns, skin tears, acute surgical wounds and pressure injuries.

For more information visit woundinnovations.com.au or call 1300 968 637.

breast cancer

Breast cancer probe detects deadly cells

Featured image above: Dr Erik Shartner with the prototype optical fibre sensor, which can detect breast cancer during surgery. Credit: University of Adelaide

An optical fibre probe has been developed to detect breast cancer tissue during surgery.

Working with excised breast cancer tissue, researchers from the University of Adelaide developed the device to differentiate cancerous cells from healthy ones.

Project leader at the Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) Dr Erik Schartner said the probe could reduce the need for follow-up surgery, which is currently required in up to 20 per cent of breast cancer cases.

“At the moment most of the soft tissue cancers use a similar method during surgery to identify whether they’ve gotten all the cancer out, and that method is very crude,” he says.

“They’ll get some radiology beforehand which tells them where the cancer should be, and the surgeon then will remove it to the best of their ability.

“But the conclusive measurements are done with pathology a couple of days or a couple of weeks after the surgery, so the patient is sown back up, thinks the cancer is removed and then they discover two weeks later with a call from the surgeon that they need to go through this whole traumatic process again.”

The probe allows more accurate measurements be taken during surgery, with the surgeon provided with information via an LED light.

Using a pH probe tip, a prototype sensor was able to distinguish cancerous and healthy cells with 90 per cent accuracy.

The research behind the probe, published today in Cancer Research, found pH was a useful tool to distinguish the two types of tissue because cancerous cells naturally produce more acid during growth.

Currently the probe is aimed for use solely for treating breast cancer, but there is some possibility for it to be used as both a diagnostic tool and during other removal surgeries.

“The method we’re using, which is basically measuring the pH of the tissue, actually looks to be common across virtually all cancer types,” Schartner says.

“We can actually see there’s some scope there for diagnostic application for things like thyroid cancer, or even melanoma, which is something we’re following up.

“The question is more about the application as to how useful it is during surgery, to be able to get this identification, and in some of the other soft tissue cancers it would be useful as well.”

Earlier this year, researchers from CNBP also developed a fibre optic probe,  which could be used to examine the effects of drug use on the brain.

Schartner said both probes were noteworthy because they were far thinner than previously developed models at only a few microns across.

“The neat thing we see about this one is that it’s a lot quicker than some of the other commercial offerings and also the actual sample size you can measure is much smaller, so you get better resolution,” he says.

Researchers on the probe hope to progress to clinical trials in the near future, with a tentative product launch date in the next three years.

Also in Adelaide, researchers at the University of South Australia’s Future Industries Institute are developing tiny sensors that can detect the spread of cancer through the lymphatic system while a patient is having surgery to remove primary tumours, which could also dramatically reduce the need for follow up operations.

– Thomas Luke 

This article was first published by The Lead South Australia on 29 November 2016. Read the original article here.